Mars Apparition 2005.

The 2005 apparition of Mars is the best placed opposition vs disk diameter of all oppositions in the series. The declination reaches +16, while the disk diameter exceeds 20 arc seconds at opposition time, and remaining well placed again until solar conjunction.

 

Click for full size images.

Mars rotation movie 2005. The whole face of the Planet seen rotating. Phase and SPC size as per June 2005.


Click for full size images.

Annotated Martian Map 2005. The whole face of Mars with all features labelled, including the lander locations.


Click for full size images.

The entire face of Mars in 2005. The whole face of the Planet seen during October-November 2005.


Click for full size images.

Mars on April 24th, 2006. Dia=5.0". The 135th and final session of Mars images for this excellent apparition.


Click for full size images.

Mars on April 23rd, 2006. Dia=5.04"


Click for full size images.

Mars on April 22nd, 2006. Dia=5.07"


Click for full size images.

Mars on April 21st, 2006. Dia=5.09"


Click for full size images.

Mars on April 20th, 2006. Dia=5.12"


Click for full size images.

Mars on April 19th, 2006. Dia=5.14"


Click for full size images.

Mars on April 18th, 2006. Dia=5.17"


Click for full size images.

Mars on April 17th, 2006. Dia=5.19"


Click for full size images.

Mars on April 16th, 2006. Dia=5.22"


Click for full size images.

Mars on April 15th, 2006. Dia=5.24"


Click for full size images.

Mars on April 14th, 2006. Dia=5.27"


Click for full size images.

Mars on April 13th, 2006. Dia=5.30"


Click for full size images.

Mars on April 11th, 2006. Dia=5.36"


Click for full size images.

Mars on April 10th, 2006. Dia=5.38"


Click for full size images.

Mars on April 9th, 2006. Dia=5.41"


Click for full size images.

Mars on April 8th, 2006. Dia=5.44"


Click for full size images.

Mars on April 7th, 2006. Dia=5.47"


March 22nd, 2006. Ls=29. Diam=6.01". The Elysium hemisphere is central in these images, with Elysium itself appearing as a brighter patch. The NPC is brilliant, with some mist over Syrtis Major and Ausonia. Gomer Sinus is visible despite D=6".  14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


March 15th, 2006. Ls=25. Diam=6.29". Syrtis Major is prominent in these images appearing rather narrow and pointed. Hellas is misty and the NPC is shining brilliantly. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


March 4th, 2006. Ls=20. Diam=6.79". Similar details to the previous day, but the amount of cloud activity seems to have notably increased, with the Argyre cloud merging into the SPH, a weak haze over Chryse, and some remians of the NPH. Note the bright cloud over Nilokeras. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


March 3rd, 2006. Ls=20. Diam=6.84". Mare Erythraeum and Mare Acidalium are central Note minor details clearly seen such as Juventae fons and Oxia Palus despite D=6.8". The NPC is brilliant. The bright cloud over Argyre remians. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


March 2nd, 2006. Ls=19. Diam=6.89". Mare Erythraeum and Mare Acidalium is well seen on the disk. A bright NPC is seen. Note the persistent cloud over Argyre remians. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


March 1st, 2006. Ls=19. Diam=6.94". Mare Erythraeum is coming into view along with Mare Acidalium to the North. A brilliant cloud over Argyre. The NPC is shining brightly. Complex details across Melas lacus/Coprates. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


February 28th, 2006. Ls=18. Diam=6.99". Solis Lacs is again central on these images. A bright cloud over Argyre. The Tharsis volcanoes are again seen as small spots. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


February 25h, 2006. Ls=17. Diam=7.15". Solis Lacs is central in these images. The SPH is extensive and bright. Bright mist also over Aurorae Sinus. Coprates/Melas Lacus etc is well seen. The Tharsis volcanoes are also visible as small dark spots. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


February 24th, 2006. Ls=17. Diam=7.21". Solis Lacus is well seen in these images. Note also the small dark spots of the Tharsis volcanoes are clearly seen. The SPH is dense and bright, while the NPC can again be seen. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


February 20th, 2006. Ls=15. Diam=7.44". Mare Sirenum is well seen, with Solis Lacus on the bright limb. Propontis is dark with the NPC again visible. The SPH is very condensed and billiant. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


February 18th, 2006. Ls=14. Diam=7.55". Mare Sirenum/Cimmerium is central with the projections of Gomer Sinus visible. Elysium is bright but cloud free with the small dots of Trivium-Cerberus seen. Propontis is prominent. The thick SPH remians prominent. NPC again seen. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


February 17th, 2006. Ls=13. Diam=7.62". Mare Sirenum is central with the projections of Gomer Sinus visible coming onto the disk. Elysium is bright but cloud free with the small dots of Trivium-Cerberus seen. The thick SPH remians prominent. The true North Polar Cap boundary is seen for the first time as the hood has almost gone. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


February 11th, 2006. Ls=10. Diam=8.01". Mare Cimmerium is central with the projections of Gomer Sinus visible. Elysium is bright but cloud free. The thick SPH remians prominent. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


February 10th, 2006. Ls=10. Diam=8.08". Syrtis Major is again visible along with Ausonia, Mare Cimmerium, and Nodus Alcyonius. A thickening SPH is visible as the southern autumn is now well underway. The typical bright cloud over Libya is also prominent. The NPC is now mostly hood free at this season. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


February 9th, 2006. Ls=9. Diam=8.15". Syrtis Major is visible along with Ausonia, Mare Cimmerium, and Nodus Alcyonius. A thickening SPH is visible as the southern autumn is now well underway. The typical bright cloud over Libya is also prominent. The NPC is now mostly hood free at this season. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


January 29th, 2006. Ls=4. Diam=9.00". Sinus Meridiani has again come into view, with a misty Hellas on the limb. The NPH remian brilliant with fainter clouds seen across the Planet. This session was my 100th night of Mars imaging for this apparition. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


January 24th, 2006. Ls=2. Diam=9.44". Argyre is very well seen with a bright cloud over the basin in Blue. The NPH is very bright at these longitudes. The fingers of Aurorae Sinus are dark and prominent. The SPH is misty and extending northward. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


January 22nd, 2006. Ls=1. Diam=9.62". Much the same detail visible as the day before though the Argyre cloud is weaker. Some faint mists across Ophir/Candor and Tharsis. The NPH remians bright across Mare Acidalium. Ascraeus Mons is also seen again near the terminator. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


January 21st, 2006. Ls=0. Diam=9.72". Mars is now less than 10 arc seconds in apparent diameter. Also the Martian season has reached 0 degrees (northern spring/southern autumn.) Lots of cloud activity is present, with a bright cloud over the Argyre basin. Arsia, Ascraeus and Olympus Mons are all seen as dark spots (Olympus is very close to the terminator.) The southern polar hood is forming as the the southern hemisphere starts to cool. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


January 17th, 2006. Ls=358. Diam=10.10". Solis Lacus and Tharsis are present well in these images. Ascraeus Mons appears as a dark spot, while Olympus Mons is also faintly seen as a dusky spot. The NPH remians bright, with a faint cloud across Ausonia. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


January11th, 2006. Ls=355. Diam=10.76". Mars grows smaller in the evening sky. These images show the Mare Sirenium hemisphere. Note the brilliant white cloud at left over the Arsia Mons volcano. The South Polar Hood is forming, and the cap will start to increase in size again beneath the hood. The NPH remians brilliant.  14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


January 4th, 2006. Ls=351. Diam=11.58". Mars is now around half the apparent diameter compared to opposition time. Syrtis Major and Hellas are well presented. The prongs of Gomer Sinus can be clearly seen. The edge of the frozen North Polar Cap can also be seen which is at its maximum extent. Some misty haze across the SPC. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


December 25th, 2005. Ls=346. Diam=12.93". Mare Erythraeum is central, with the fingers at Aurorae Sinus prominent. Solis Lacys is well seen, and the SPC is present, though it remains small and misty. The NPH is brilliant. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


December 19th, 2005. Ls=343. Diam=13.82". Mare Erythraeum is central, with the fingers at Aurorae Sinus prominent. Solis Lacys is well seen, and the SPC is present, though it remains small and misty. The NPH is brilliant. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


December 17th, 2005. Ls=342. Diam=14.14". Mare Erythraeum is central, with the fingers at Aurorae Sinus prominent. Solis Lacys is well seen, and the SPC is present, though it remains small and misty. The NPH is brilliant. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


December 10th, 2005. Ls=338. Diam=15.27". Solis Lacus is present on the shrinking martian disk. Olympus Mons is faintly seen, while there is some notable morning mists present. The SPC remians small and rather misty. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


December 6th, 2005. Ls=336. Diam=15.94". The Elysium hemisphere of Mars is well presented here. Elysium Mons itself is seen as a small bright spot. The prongs of Gomer Sinus are dark and prominent, while Trivium-Cerberus shows its familar two dots appearance. Also note the clouds and mists in the Blue light image. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


December 4th, 2005. Ls=335. Diam=16.27". Now 20% smaller than at opposition. The Elysium hemisphere of Mars is well presented. Elysium Mons itself is seen as a small bright spot. The prongs of Gomer Sinus are dark and prominent, while Trivium-Cerberus shows its familar two dots appearance. Also note the clouds and mists in the Blue light image. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


November 29th, 2005. Ls=332. Diam=17.10". Syrtis Major and Hellas are prominent in these images. The Martian phase is increasing notably, and the diameter is already 15% smaller than opposition. Note the very dark Mare Serpentis in the Blue Light image. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


November 20th, 2005. Ls=327. Diam=18.48".

Syrtis Major has finally rotated into view. Note the Martian phase it begining to narrow again as the the Earth and Mars are moving apart again. The diameter is also shrinking rapdily now. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


November 19th, 2005. Ls=327. Diam=18.63".

Sinus Meridiani is on the meridian in these images. Note the faint spots projecting from it (and Oxia Palus.) Several misty morning clouds can be seen, along with a bright NPH. Syrtis Major/Hellas are also seen on the evening limb.  14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


November 17th, 2005. Ls=325. Diam=18.88".

Mare Erythraeum is central in these images, with Mare Acidalium covered with a brilliant and disturbed NPH. The Indus "canal" is seen connecting Nillacus Lacus with Oxia Palus. Aurorae Sinus is prominent, as is Coprates/Melas Lacus.  14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


November 13th, 2005. Ls=324. Diam=19.35".

Again the regions of Aurorae Sinus (with its projecting "fingers"), Solis Lacus and Mare Erythraeum are all prominent in this series of images. Also a bright north polar hood obscures Mare Acidalium.  14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


November 12th, 2005. Ls=323. Diam=19.46".

The regions of Aurorae Sinus (with its projecting "fingers"), Solis Lacus and Mare Erythraeum are all prominent in this series of images. Also a bright north polar hood obscures Mare Acidalium. Olympus Mons can also be seen on the morning limb. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


November 9th, 2005. Ls=321. Diam=19.72".

Solis Lacus is almost central in these images with the dark "Y" shaped marking of Valles Marineris surround it to the North. Olympus Mons again shines as a bright patch on the surface. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


November 6th, 2005. Ls=320. Diam=19.94". 10 hours before opposition.

Solis Lacus is turning onto the disk, with many fine details resolved across the Mare Sirenum. Olympus Mons shines as a bright spot on the surface while Ascraeus Mons is also seen as a bright spot. These images were taken only 10 hours prior to exact opposition. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


November 3rd, 2005. Ls=318. Diam=20.08".

Mare Sirenum is presented in these images. Note the huge volaco Olympus Mons shining brightly at the bottom left. ALso note the south polar cap can hardly be seen now, having almost melted away completely as seen at this longitude. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


October 25-26th, 2005. Ls=313. Diam=20.11".

Syrtis Major can be seen along with Hellas and Mare Cimmerium. The Elysium shield volcano can be seen near the evening limb. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F40. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


October 22-23rd, 2005. Ls=311. Diam=19.99".

In this long series, a significant dust cloud was captured across Argyre, with smaller dust cores present across Chryse and Mare Erythraeum. The dust activity it best seen in the last three images in the sequence. 9.25" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F42. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


October 21st, 2005. Ls=310. Diam=19.88".

Syrtis Major is central on the martian disk with Hellas to the South. Zea Lacus/Peneus is clear within Hellas. A brilliant morning limb cloud is present over Noachis, assocaited with a large dust disturbance. The North Polar Hood is less dense at this longitude. 9.25" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F42. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


October 18th, 2005. Ls=309. Diam=19.68".

Sabeaus Sinus is seen across the central meridian. Hellas and Syrtis Major are now clearly visible, with a prominent evening cloud present over Libya across Syrtis Major. The North Polar Hood is again dense. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


October 17th, 2005. Ls=308. Diam=19.55".

Sinus Meridiani is again well defined on the central meridian. The North Polar Hood is dense over Mare Acidalium. Hellas and Syrtis Major are emerging from the evening limb. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


October 16th, 2005. Ls=306. Diam=19.41".

Sinus Meridiani is well defined on the central meridian, with many fine details visible. The North Polar Hood is dense over Mare Acidalium, with a weak haze visible over Solis Lacus on the morning limb. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


October 11th, 2005. Ls=304. Diam=19.01".

Similar details to yesterday. Aurorae Sinus is now coming onto the disk with the familiar "fingers" around Juventae Fons  Solis Lacus is again prominent, with notable detail within Coprates/Melas Lacus (part of Valles Marineris.) A dense north polar hood is present, with delicate clouds over Candor/Ophir and Tharsis 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


October 10th, 2005. Ls=303. Diam=18.91".

Aurorae Sinus is now coming onto the disk with the familiar "fingers" around Juventae Fons  Solis Lacus is again prominent, with notable detail within Coprates/Melas Lacus (part of Valles Marineris.) A dense north polar hood is present, with delicate clouds over Candor/Ophir and Tharsis 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


October 5th, 2005. Ls=300. Diam=18.32".

The eye of Mars is now clear as Mars fast approaches its closest on October 30th. The dark "canals" Nectar, Acampsis and Phasis all appear well defined and detail raiditating from the centre of Solis Lacus. Tithonius Lacus and Melas lacus appear dark and detailed - these features are part of the vast Valles Marineris canyon system. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


September 28th, 2005. Ls=295. Diam=17.44".

Mare Sirenum and Tharsis are well presented in this series of images. Trivium-Cerberus is seen as two dots, also the Propontis complex is well seen close to the North Polar Hood. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


Mars grows nearer

During late September Mars started to grow to a reasonable size on its way to its closest approach at the end of October 2005. The region of Mare Cimmerium is central in this series of images across three nights, with a wealth of fine detail visible across the Martian disk 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


September 23rd, 2005. Ls=294. Diam=16.79".

Mare Cimmerium is now central with Syrtis Major and Hellas now on the morning limb. The dark "prongs" of Gomer Sinus are prominent. Elysium is bright with Trivium-Cerberus seen as two small dots. The NPH is thick but partially transparent.. Hyblaeus extension appears dark and doubled. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


September 22nd, 2005. Ls=293. Diam=16.66".

Mare Cimmerium is now central with Syrtis Major and Hellas now on the morning limb. The dark "prongs" of Gomer Sinus are prominent. Elysium is bright with Trivium-Cerberus seen as two small dots. The NPH is thick but partially transparent. Note the different coloured areas in the Martian desert areas. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


September 21st, 2005. Ls=292. Diam=16.54".

Mare Cimmerium has come into view with Syrtis Major and Hellas now on the morning limb. The dark "prongs" of Gomer Sinus are prominent. Elysium is bright with Trivium-Cerberus seen as two small dots. The NPH is thick but partially transparent. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


September 20th, 2005. Ls=291. Diam=16.41".

Syrtis Major is again prominent with albedo variations visible across it. Hellas looks yellowish with Peneus/Zea Lacus visible inside it  A morning mist is visible over Hellas in the early image which melts away as local noon approaches. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


September 18th, 2005. Ls=290. Diam=16.16".

Syrtis Major is again prominent with albedo variations visible across it. Hellas looks yellowish with Peneus/Zea Lacus visible inside it  A morning mist is visible over Hellas in the early image which melts away as local noon approaches. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


September 17th, 2005. Ls=290. Diam=16.03".

Syrtis Major is central on the Martian disk with Hellas to the South. The NPH is much less dense at these longitudes  The SPC has melted considerably during the last month. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


September 13th, 2005. Ls=287. Diam=15.54".

Syrtis Major is coming into view over the evening terminator. Hellas is misty and yellowish  The NPH remains dense over Mare Acidalium 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


September 9th, 2005. Ls=285. Diam=15.05".

Sinus Meridiani is prominent at disk centra in the early images showing its forked appearance. A large misty north polar hood is present over Mare Acidalium, and the hood is transparent in places.  14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


September 7th, 2005. Ls=284. Diam=14.82".

Mare Erythraeum is central in these images, with Argyre to the south covered in a light mist. Juvenatae Fons is dark, as is the entire complex of Valles Marineris.  A prominent misty north polar hood is present over Mare Acidalium, with notable condensations within it. A weak haze is present extending over Candor/Ophir into Tharsis. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


September 2nd, 2005. Ls=280. Diam=14.25".

Solis Lacus is agaiin central in these images. Olympus and Ascraeus Mons also appear dark again in Blue. A weak haze is present of Argyre on the evening terminator, while further weak clouds are present over Candor and Tharsis. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


August 30th, 2005. Ls=279. Diam=13.92".

Solis Lacus is appearing from the evening limb, Several dark "canals" emanate from its centre. Tithonius Lacus appears complex with darker nuclei. Olympus and Ascraeus Mons appear dark, especially in the B image 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


August 29th, 2005. Ls=278. Diam=13.81".

All four Tharsis volcanoes can be seen in this series of images darkening as they approach the evening terminator. Solis :Lacus is all present in the early images showing complex details. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


August 28th, 2005. Ls=277. Diam=13.71".

Lots of intereting detail present. The dark redish spot near disk centre is the giant volcano Olympus Mons casting a lengthening shadow in the evening sun. A doubled Orogprahic cloud can be seen around the peak of Arsia Mons which thickens as it nears the evening terminator  Ascraeus and Pavonis Mons also cast shadows near the evening terminator. All four Tharsis volcanoes can be seen in the 2nd and 3rd images. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


August 24th, 2005. Ls=275. Diam=13.30".

Mare Sirenum runs across the southern half of the disk, with a dark prominent condensation in the Valhalla marking to the north. The pronpontis complex can be seen in the far north. A light north polar hood is present 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


August 23rd, 2005. Ls=274. Diam=13.21".

Elysium is near disk centre in these images. Trivium-Cerberus appears as two small dots. Some faint south polar hazes are present 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


August 18th, 2005. Ls=271. Diam=12.78".

Mare Cimmerium is again central in these images with delicate channels visible across Hesperia and Ausonia. A bright morning limb haze extends from Hellas across Libya into the north polar hood 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


August 17th, 2005. Ls=270. Diam=12.64".

Mare Cimmerium is central in these images with delicate channels visible across Hesperia and Ausonia. A faint cloud is visible close to Elysium, while the North Polar Hood has become brighter. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


August 17th, 2005. Ls=270. Diam=12.64".

Mare Cimmerium is central in these images with delicate channels visible across Hesperia and Ausonia. A faint cloud is visible close to Elysium, while the North Polar Hood has become brighter. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


August 16th, 2005. Ls=270. Diam=12.56".

Syrtis Major is again present, with Alcyonius Nodus off its NE end. Haze is present around the SPC and Hellas, with a weak cloud visible of the Lubya desert region. The two small prongs of Gomer Sinus are clear extending from Mare Cimmerium 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


August 15th, 2005. Ls=269. Diam=12.48".

Syrtis Major is again present, with Alcyonius Nodus off its NE end. Haze is present around the SPC and Hellas, with a weak cloud visible of the Lubya desert region. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


August 13th, 2005. Ls=269. Diam=12.28".

Syrtis Major is central in these images. Hellas again has a light mist over it. Note a spot like marking in southern Hellas, present in the previous sessions also. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


August 11th, 2005. Ls=267. Diam=12.11".

Sinus Meridiani is central with its northward projecting forks. A light haze is present over Hellas on the evening limb, with some artic haze present near the SPC. Syrtis major is almost fully emerged from the evening terminator. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


August 10th, 2005. Ls=267. Diam=12.04".

Sinus Meridiani is central with its northward projecting forks. A light haze is present over Hellas on the evening limb, with some artic haze present near the SPC. Syrtis Major is appearing from the evening limb. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


August 9th, 2005. Ls=266. Diam=11.94".

Sinus Meridiani is central with its northward projecting forks. A light haze is present over Hellas on the evening limb, with some artic haze present near the SPC. Syrtis Major is appearing from the evening limb. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


August 8th, 2005. Ls=265. Diam=11.86".

Sinus Meridiani is central with its northward projecting forks. A light haze is present over Hellas on the evening limb, with some artic haze present near the SPC. Mare Acidalium is also hazy in the north. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


August 7th, 2005. Ls=264. Diam=11.78".

Sinus Meridiani is central with its northward projecting forks. A light haze is present over Hellas on the evening limb, with some artic haze present near the SPC. Mare Acidalium is also hazy in the north. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


August 2nd, 2005. Ls=261. Diam=11.38".

Mare Erythraeum is centre, with Argyre dusky. Remnants of the SPC outlier Argenteus Mons is visible. North Polar Hood prominent over Mare Acidalium 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


July 30th, 2005. Ls=259. Diam=11.18".

Tithonius Lacus and Solis Lacus are well seen. Juvenate Fons appears dark. Note the faint rift in the SPC which is normal for the season. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


July 22nd, 2005. Ls=253. Diam=10.6".

Mare Sirenum is present, Phasis/Daedelia on the edge of Solis Lacus visible near the limb. Note the dark spot of Olympus Mons in the afternoon sun. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


July 17th, 2005. Ls=251. Diam=10.29".

Elysium is on the meridian with Trivium Charontis again seen as two dots. Valhalla marking is quite prominent with a darkening in its eastern end. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


July 16th, 2005. Ls=250. Diam=10.22".

Elysium is on the meridian with Trivium Charontis again seen as two dots. Also note the Valhalla marking is quite prominent. 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


July 14th, 2005. Ls=249. Diam=10.08".

A wealth of detail is again visible for 10 arc seconds. Novus Mons possibly detached from the SPC Hesperia is broad, with Cerberus III visible. Trivium Charontis seen as two dots 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


July 13th, 2005. Ls=248. Diam=10.0".

A wealth of detail visible for 10 arc seconds. Note how much the SPC has shrunk compared to the images below of the same region Novus Mons possible detached from the SPC Hesperia is broad, with Cerberus III visible . 14" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F39. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


May 9th, 2005. Ls=208. Diam=7.0".

Elysium is now visible, with Hyblaeus dark. Hesperia prominent, with haze over Hellas. SPC rift seen. 9.25" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F42. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


May 7th, 2005. Ls=207. Diam=6.9".

Elysium now coming into view, with Hyblaeus. Hesperia prominent. Syrtis major dark near the limb, and bright haze over Hellas. 9.25" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F42. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


May 4th, 2005. Ls=206. Diam=6.9".

Syrtis Major and Hellas staring to rotate away. Note the bright patch near Syrtis Major on these images at the day before 9.25" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F42. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


May 3rd, 2005. Ls=205. Diam=6.8".

Syrtis Major and Hellas at centre. Note the markings inside Hellas. SPC rift more clearly seen, with Novus Mons faintly seen 9.25" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F42. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


May 2nd, 2005. Ls=205. Diam=6.8".

Syrtis Major and Hellas at centre, with markings inside Hellas. Faint SPC rift again visible. 9.25" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F42. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


May 1st, 2005. Ls=204. Diam=6.8".

Syrtis Major and Hellas now take centre stage on the disk. Note the faint SPC rift. 9.25" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F42. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


April 29th, 2005. Ls=203. Diam=6.7". Sinus Meridiani is about to disappear, with the bright patch of Edom alongside it. Syrtis Major and Hellas are now appearing. 9.25" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F42. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


April 28th, 2005. Ls=202. Diam=6.7".

Sabeus Sinus is again centre stage, with Hellaspontus to the South. Hellas itself is on the dark limb, with Syrtis Major soon to appear. 9.25" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F42. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


April 27th, 2005. Ls=201. Diam=6.6".

Sabeus Sinus is centre stage, with Hellaspontus to the South. Note the faint haze on the bright limb in the B filter image. 9.25" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F42. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


April 25th, 2005. Ls=199. Diam=6.6".

Sinus Meridiani and Sabaeus Sinus are prominent in this view. Also note Argyre toward the limb. Edom is seen as a small bright patch. 9.25" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F42. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


April 24th, 2005. Ls=198. Diam=6.5".

Mare Erythraeum and Chryse are at the centre of the disk - note the bright patch in Chryse. Mare Acidalium is seen to the north, with Sinus Meridiani coming into view. 9.25" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F42. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


April 22nd, 2005. Ls=197. Diam=6.4".

Mare Erythraeum and Chryse are at the centre of the disk. Also Mare Acidalium is seen to the north. 9.25" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F42. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


April 20th, 2005. Ls=197. Diam=6.4".

These images show the Mare Erythraeum region coming intro view, with Solis Lacus toward the limb. Tithonius Lacus is also prominent. 9.25" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F42. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.


April 19th, 2005. Ls=196. Diam=6.3".

The first images of the apparition, showing Solis Lacus, and a large South Polar Cap (SPC.) 9.25" Schmidt Cassegrain @ F42. Lumenera Lu075M CCD camera.

 


Copyright 2003-2004. www.damianpeach.com. No material used within this website may be used, amended or distributed without the consent of the webmaster.