Part 2.

The Moon is a truly fascinating object, and in this section you'll find an extensive number of high resolution lunar portraits covering many of the Moons most interesting formations. The images below were taken during, 2007, 2008 and a few from 2009 from various locations. At the time of writing in July 2009, some 40 years after the Apollo 11 landing, the completion of this body of work seems quite timely!

About the images.

All the images below were taken with a Celestron C14 Schmidt Cassegrain and Lumenera and SKYnyx 2.0M camera. The images were taken either from St.Phillip, Barbados, West Indies (1306 N, 5930' W) or Loudwater, South East UK (5135 N, 00 46 W.)


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Abenezra, Azophi & Geber                               

This small group of little know craters lies in the rugged southern highlands of the Moon, all are around 45km in diameter. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. June 5th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Abulfeda & Almanon

These two craters are located in the central highlands of the Moon. They are 65km and 51km in diameter respectively. Note the crater chain stretching from Abulfeda out of the field. This chain stretches more than 200km in length across the Rupes Altai. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. Sep 20th, 2008, Loudwater, UK.


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Apianus.

This prominent 63km wide crater lies in the south central highlands of the Moon. It is around 2km deep, and was formed around 3.9 Billion years ago. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. Sep 20th, 2008, Loudwater, UK.


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Archimedes.

This large and prominent 83km wide crater lies on the eastern edge of the Mare Imbrium. The faint streaks across its floor are the ejecta rays from the nearby Autolycus crater. The area between Archimedes and Autolycus is where the Russian Luna 2 probe crashed landed in September 1959, It was the first man made craft to reach the lunar surface. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 26th, 2007 and Sep 20th, 2008, Barbdaos, W.I. and Loudwater, UK.


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Aristillus.

This prominent 55km wide crater lies to the south west of Archimedes. This crater has a bright impact ray system extending for more than 600km. Note the faint remains of a ghost crater off the top left almost completely buried by ancient lava flows. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 26th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Aristoteles.

This well known impact crater lies on the southern edge of the Mare Frigoris. It is 87km across and forms a prominent pairing with the nearby Eudoxus crater. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 26th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Arzachel.

Another well known crater forming a famous trio with the larger Alphonsus and Ptolemaeus craters to the North. Arzachel is the youngest of the three, and is 96km in diameter. A variety of interesting features are associated with this crater such as the faint rille system across the crater floor. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 26th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Atlas & Hercules.

This prominent pairing (87 and 69km in diameter) lie in the northeast part of the Moon near to the large Endymion crater. Atlas is especially interesting showing a fractured floor appearance, and within its walls are also some dark halo craters - volcanic material erupted from them millennia ago causing the dark appearance of these features. Note the dark patches resulting from these craters at the 12 and 4 o'clock positions within Atlas. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 22nd, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Autolycus.

This prominent small lunar impact crater is 39km across and lies just to the south of Aristillus (just seen at the top of the frame.) It has a faint impact ray system extending around 400km from the crater, some material of which crosses the floor of the nearby Archimedes crater. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 26th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Baco.

This impact crater lies in the southern highlands. It is 69km in diameter. It is quite heavily eroded from many smaller impacts since the formation of the original crater billions of years ago. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 23rd, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Bailly & Hausen

Baily is a massive ancient impact crater more than 300km across. It is the largest crater on the near side of the Moon. The massive crater rim is heavily eroded and is only faintly visible due to it being worn away by the countless impacts since its formation. In contrast, the crater Hausen (visible on the limb behind Bailly) is much younger, with prominent central peak and terraced walls. For further information on Hausen see further down the page. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. Aug 5th, 2007, Loudwater, UK.


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Ball & Sasserides.

These two contrasting craters lie in southern highlands of the Moon near the famous Tycho crater. Ball (the lower smaller crater) is 41km in diameter. Sasserides however is hardly distinguishable - its rim is only faintly visible in the upper part of this mosiac having been heavily erroded by countless impacts over the centuries. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 27th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Beaumont.

This lava flooded crater located on the edge of the Mare Nectaris is 53km across. Its central peak was long since burried beneath the lava flows the flooded it. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 22nd, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Carpenter & Pascal.

Carpenter (59km) and Pascal (115km) are two very differing impact craters. Carpenter being a much younger and less eroded formation than the worn and battered Pascal. Both craters are located near the north western limb of the Moon and always appear foreshortened as seen from Earth. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 31st, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Cassini.

This fascinating crater 57km across is located on the eastern edge of the Mare Imbrium. Note the peculiar appearance of Cassini A within the main crater walls, and its strange hummocky central peak. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 26th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Clavius at Sunrise.

Clavius is the third largest crater on the Lunar near side being 225km in diameter. It was formed some ~4 billion years ago, and has since been peppered by numerous smaller impacts, such as the prominent Rutherfurd crater visible at upper left. This low view taken as the sun rises over the crater shows the rough texture of the crater floor not apparent in views under more typical lighting conditions such as the view below. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 26th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Clavius, Blancanus & Scheiner.

This view of Clavius and surroundings shows the area under more typical lighting conditions. Blancanus (105km) and Scheiner (110km) can be seen to the right of Clavius. Note the countless impact craters covering Clavius itself, the two largest being Rutherfurd and Porter. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. June 6th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Copernicus and surroundings.

One of the most prominent and spectacular craters on the Moon, it was formed around 800 million years ago when a large object smashed into the lunar surface. Copernicus has an extensive impact ray system stretching around 800km out from the crater, and is easily visible in binoculars close to full Moon. Copernicus itself is 93km in diameter. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 27 and 28th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Catena Davy.

This curving string of around 23 tiny craterlets runs between the Davy and Ptolemaeus craters. It is believed to have been formed by a body that broke up prior to impacting on the lunar surface. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 26th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Delambre.

Located to the southwest of the Mare Tranquilitatis, this impact crater is 52km in diameter. It is quite a deep crater, with the rim being 3.5km above the crater floor. Delambre was the impact site of the NASA lunar probe, Ranger 8 in February 1965 which took more than 7000 pictures of the Moon during its mission. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. June 4th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Drygalski.

This large lunar impact crater is not well seen from the Earth due to the affects of libration. It is 149km in diameter and lies close to the southern polar craters. If it were nearer the centre of the Moon it would be one of the most prominent craters. These oblique views taken under favourable libration clearly showing the hummocky crater rim and central peak. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. Both Sep 20th, 2008, Loudwater, UK.


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Eratosthenes and surroundings.

This prominent and deep impact crater lies at the southern end of the Montes Apenninus and is 58km in diameter and some 3.6km deep. It was formed around 3.2 billion years ago. In 1924 W.H Pickering proposed dark patches he saw changing from day to day within the crater were possibly herds of small life forms! C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. April 3rd, 2009, UK and May 26th, 2007, Barbados.


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Eudoxus.

Forming a prominent pair with the Aristoteles crater to the North, Eudoxus is 37km in diameter and more than 3km deep. Note the cluster of small hills in the centre of the crater. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 26th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Euler.

A small isolated impact crater located in the southern half of the Mare Imbrium. It is 28km in diameter and has a small ray system extending around 200km out from the crater. Note the small cluster of central peaks in the centre of the crater. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 28th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Faraday.

Located in the southern highlands of the Moon and overlaying the rim of the larger Stofler crater, Faraday is around 70km in diameter. This crater has been overlain by other impacts most notably the pair of craters to the upper right. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. Sep 20th, 2008. Loudwater, UK.


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Gemma Frisius & Goodacre.

These two craters are located in the southern highlands of the Moon. This formation bears some resemblance to a paw print with Goodacre attached to the northern rim of Gemma Frisius. These craters are 88km and 46km in diameter respectively. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. June 5th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Grove.

A small impact crater which lies in the north eastern part of the Moon just to the south of the Hercules crater. It is 28km in diameter. Note the interesting inner ring formed by material slumping down from the inner wall. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 23rd, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Gutenberg.

This ancient formation lies in the eastern part of the Moon a little way east of the Theophilus crater. This worn an eroded formation is around 74km in diameter and was flooded by ancient lava flows, almost burrying the central peaks of the crater. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 22nd, 2007, Barbados, W.I, and Oct 18th, 2008, UK.


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Hadley Rille.

Thought to be the remains of a collapsed lava tube, this meandering channel was the landing site of Apollo 15 in July 1971. It is about 1.5km wide, while the mountains around it are more than 4km high. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 26th, 2007, Barbados, W.I, and Sep 20th, 2008, UK.


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Hausen.

This large impact crater lies on the far south western edge of the visible Moon and can only be seen from Earth during favourable librations. Hausen is 167km in diameter and if better visible from Earth would be one of the most prominent visible craters. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. Sep 20th, 2008, UK.


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Heraclitus.

This complex formation of overlaying impact craters lies in the rugged southern highlands of the Moon. It is an ancient and heavily worn formation dating back some 4 billion years. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. Sep 20th, 2008, UK.


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Hermite & the North Polar region.

This view of the Lunar North Pole shows rarely seen features only visible under favourable libration. The large crater just left of centre is Hermite, while other far northern craters such as Rozhdestvenskiy, Peary are also visible. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. June 4th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Herschel.

This relatively fresh impact crater 41km in diameter lies close to the huge Ptolemaeus crater. It is also a very deep crater, with the floor almost 4km below the crater rim. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 26th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Horrocks.

Located within the walls of the large, erroded Hipparchus crater, Horrocks is a much fresher formation than that it lies within, though is still more than 1 billion years old!  It is 30km in diameter and 3km deep.  C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 26th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Hortensius and domes.

This fascinating area is the site of several small lunar "domes." These domes are ancient shield volcanoes formed by lava millennia ago. Each dome is around 6 - 8km in diameter and rising to about 400m in height. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 27th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Hyginus and Rima Hyginus.

This peculiar feature consists of a small 11km diameter crater intersected by a strange cratered rille. It stretches for around 220km in length, and the whole feature, including the main crater is thought to be volcanic in origin possibly by collapse of underlying structures. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 26th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Lacus Mortis.

This 151km diameter walled plain lies in north eastern part of the Moon. It is a complex formation consisting of a system of rilles, as well as the prominent impact crater Burg located close to the centre. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 23rd, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Lambert.

Lambert is 30km in diameter and lies in the southern half of the Mare Imbrium. It is a relatively fresh and well preserved impact crater. To the lower left is part of the rim of the "ghost crater" Lambert R - a crater almost totally buried by ancient lava flows of the Mare Imbrium. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 28th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Lansberg.

This impact crater lies within the Mare Insularum and is 39km in diameter and 3km deep. To the southeast of this crater is the crash landing site of the soviet Luna 5 probe in May 1965. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 28th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Madler.

Madler is 28km in diameter and lies close to the edge of the large and prominent Theophilus crater (rim just visible at the left edge of this picture.) Note the bright impact ray which lies alongside the crater. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. Oct 18th, 2008, Loudwater, UK.


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Manilius.

Located on the northeast edge of the Mare Vaporum, Manilius is 39km in diameter, and more than 3km deep. It also has a bright impact ray system that extends for around 300km from the crater. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 26th, 2007, Barbados & Sep 20th, 2008, UK.


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Maurolycus & Barocius.

One of the most prominent craters in the southern highlands 114km in diameter, and more than 4km from the highest point of the crater rim to the floor. It is joined to the southeast with the Barocius crater (82km) a heavily eroded ancient crater. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 23rd, 2007, Barbados & Sep 20th, 2008, UK.


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Mons Rumker.

This isolated volcanic formation is located in the north west part of the Moon. This mound is about 70km across and about 1km high. It is a concentration of around 30 lunar domes - domes being formed from vents spewing lava and then slowly cooling. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 30th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Moretus at sunrise.

This view at very low sun angle shows the prominent crater Moretus, and its high peak just catching the first rays of Sun. Moretus is 114km in diameter, and some 5km (16,000ft) deep while the its tall central peak stand more than 2km above the crater floor. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 26th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Moretus and the southern polar region.

This large scale mosiac takes in the mountainous southern polar region of the Moon. Below centre is Moretus (114km) while above lies Short (70km), and above that Newton (79km) and close to the pole Cabeus (100km.) C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. Sep 20th, 2008, Loudwater, UK.


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Newton.

This complex mix of overlying craters is located near the southern limb of the Moon to the south of Moretus. It is 79km across. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. Sep 20th, 2008, Loudwater, UK.


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Pallas & Murchison.

These two heavily eroded craters are located near the centre of the visible Moon. They are 50 and 58km in diameter respectively. In 1953 a bright flash was seen 16km to the southeast of Pallas which may well have been an a small asteroid impacting on the surface. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 25th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Piccolomini.

This prominent impact crater 88km in diameter is located at the southwest end of the Rupes Altai. It is a deep crater being some 4.5km from the floor to the crater rim, while the large central peak is more than 2km high. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 22nd & June 4th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Pitatus & Hesiodus.

This pair of ancient impact craters is located on the southern edge of the Mare Nubium. Pitatus is a complex crater 97km in diameter whose original floor was flooded with lava. It is a fractured floor crater with a system of narrow rilles across its floor. There are also faint impact ray markings across the crater floor. Hesidous is also a heavily worn crater, but on its south west rim lies the peculair impact Crater Hesiodus A - a type of crater known as a concentric crater for the inner wall present inside. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. Dec 20th, 2008. Loudwater, UK.


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Pitiscus.

This crater is located in the far south eastern part of the visible Moon. It is 82km in diameter and 3km deep. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 22nd & June 4th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Plato.

One of the most famous and observed craters on the Moon, Plato is located on the northern edge of the Mare Imbrium. It is 109km in diameter and was formed 3.8 billion years ago. Since then the crater floor has been resurfaced by lava giving it a smooth dark appearance pitted with many smaller impact craters. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 26th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Plato at high sun.

This view of Plato showing the crater at a much higher sun angle than the image above.Note the impact rays on the northen part of the floor. The mountains surrounding Plato's floor around 2km high, though the slope down to the crater floor although appearing steep is in reality only about 15. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. Sep 20th, 2007. Loudwater, UK.


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Plinius.

Located close to the Mare Serenitatis, Plinius is a 43km diameter impact crater. It is quite a deep crater at 4.3km but lacks any visible impact ray system. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 23rd, June 4th & 5th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Ptolemaeus, Alphonsus & Arzachel.

Three of the most prominent and famous craters on the Moon. Ptolemaeus (153km), Alphonsus (119km) and Arzachel (96km) form a prominent trio of large craters near the centre of the visible Moon. Alphonsus was the impact site of the Ranger 9 probe in March 1965. The crater contains a complex system of rilles as well as dark halo craters. Arzachel is the youngest of the three craters and also contains a system of rilles, while Ptolemaeus is pitted with countless tiny craters. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 25th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Purbach.

This large ancient crater is located in the southern highlands of the Moon and is 118km in diameter. It has been battered by countless other impacts over the centuries giving it a very worn and eroded appearance. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 26th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Pythagoras.

Located close to the north west limb of the Moon, Pythagoras is a prominent impact crater 130km in diameter. It has a prominent double central peak 1.5km high. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 31st, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Reiner Gamma.

A peculiar albedo feature located on the western side of the Oceanus Procellarum. It has an overall dimension of 70km It is though to be the result of seismic waves generated by a large impact at the opposite point to Reiner Gamma on the far side of the Moon. It is also one of the strongest magnetic anomalies on the lunar surface thought to be strong enough to deflect the solar wind, giving rise to the well preserved condition of the feature. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 30th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Reinhold.

This well defined impact crater is 48km in diameter and is located near the large and prominent Copernicus crater. It is more than 3km deep and its floor contains various small hills. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 28th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Rima Brayley.

Located just to the east of the prominent Aristarchus crater this very narrow sinuous rille is some 311km long, but only about 500 metres wide. The bright crater below centre is Brayley (14km diameter.) C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 28th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Romer.

A little known impact crater located in the north eastern part of the Moon. It is 40km in diameter and 3.3km deep. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 22nd, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Rupes Altai.

This large escarpment formed when the Nectaris impact basin was created billions of years ago, and is a section of one of the impact rings. It is 427km long and range from 1-4 km in height. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. June 4th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Scoresby.

Located close to the northern limb of the Moon, this impact crater is 56km in diameter and 2.4km deep. Note the double appearance of the central peaks just catching the sunlight. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. June 4th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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South eastern highlands.

This view takes in some of the interesting craters found in the south eastern part of the Moon. Craters such as Demonax, Boguslawsky, Boussingault and Helmholtz and very prominent in this view. See Part 1 of the series for further information in these craters. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 22nd, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Stadius.

Stadius is a ghostly remnant of an ancient impact crater that has been almost completely buried by lava flows. It is located to the southwest of the prominent Eratosthenes crater. It is 69km in diameter and the whole area is covered with small craters as a result of the ejecta thrown out by the impact that created Copernicus. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 26th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Stofler.

This large impact crater in the southern highlands is 126km in diameter and is battered and worn from many subsequent impacts since its formation. Bright traces of impact rays from Tycho cover this area. The prominent Faraday crater overlays the northwestern part of the rim. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. June 6th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Theophilus, Cyrillus & Catharina.

Along with the Ptolemaeus trio, this famous trio of craters is almost as spectacular. Theophilus (at bottom) is one of the most spectacular impact craters on the Moon and is 100km in diameter. Though well preserved, it is still more than 1 billion years old. Cyrillis is partially overlayed by Theophilus being a rather older formation. Catharina is also an ancient formation overlayed by subsequent impacts.C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 22nd, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


 

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Theophilus close-ups.

Theophilus is one of the most spectacular impact craters on the Moon and is 100km in diameter and more than 3km deep. Though well preserved, it is still more than 1 billion years old. Apollo 16 collected several pieces of basalt that are believed to be ejecta from the Theophilus impact. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 22nd, Barbados & 2007 Sep 20th, 2008, UK.


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Timocharis.

A prominent impact crater located on the Mare Imbrium. It is 34km in diameter and 3km deep. The impact that created the central craterlet almost completely destroyed the original central peak. It was formed about 1 billion years ago. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 28th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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T. Mayer.

Located along the southern edge of the Mare Imbrium this impact crater is 33km in diameter. Due south of this crater is a cluster of lunar domes created by ancient volcanic activity. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 28th, 2007, Barbados, W.I.


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Tycho close-up.

One of the most prominent craters on the Moon, Tycho is 85km in diameter and almost 5km deep. The central mountains rise to 1.6km above the crater floor. Tycho is a relatively young crater being formed around 108 million years ago. It has an extensive system of impact rays stretching for some 1500km out from the crater, dominating the lunar surface at full Moon. The Surveyor 7 probe touched down just north of Tycho in January 1968 and photograhed/analyzed the area in detail. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. Sep 20th, 2008. Loudwater, UK.


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Vallis Alpes.

This famous lunar feature is located just to the east of the prominent Plato crater. It is 166km in length. The valley floor is bisected by a narrow sinuous rille which runs the length of the valley and ranges from 500 to 900 metres in width. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 26th, 2007. Barbados, W.I.


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Wargentin, Nasmyth & Phocylides.

This trio of craters is located close to the south western rim of the Moon. Phocylides is 114km in diameter, Nasmyth 77km and Wargentin 84km. Wargentin is especially unusual with the interior having been almost completely filled by ancient lava flows forming a raised Plateau. This is mostly likely the result of lava welling up inside the crater. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 30th, 2007. Barbados, W.I.


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Zucchius, Segner, Bettinus, Kircher & Wilson.

This series of impact craters are located along the south western limb of the Moon and range in size from 60-70km in diameter. Beyond this line of craters is the rim of the giant 300km diameter Bailly crater which is just visible in this view. C14 with SKYnyx 2.0M. May 30th, 2007. Barbados, W.I.

 


 

All images copyright Damian Peach. No images used on this page may be used. amended, or distributed without the consent of the author.